You're going to be a dad!

2017-02-20 14:02:29 sunveno 0

  The pregnancy test was positive and you’re going to be a dad. Is it even possible to prepare for this? Here is some advice about how you can help your partner during the birth and nursing.

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  Giving birth

  Being present at the birth of your child is a huge – unbelievably huge – moment in life. Here is some advice for how those of you who are going to be a dad, or are not giving birth yourself, can help your partner.

  1.Educate yourself. Take a childbirth class or ask people you know who already have children. Find out what your partner expects from you once the contractions start. The more you know, the easier it is to get involved.

  2.Some people engage the services of a doula, who also helps the partner not giving birth to take an active role in the delivery.

  3. Do a test run! Make sure you know how to get to the hospital (and not just to the main entrance, but also to the maternity ward). Ask the hospital about any rules affecting your participation and if you may be present during a Cesarean section.

  Nursing

  If you’re going to be a dad and/or you will not be nursing, you can still get involved. It is a wonderful sign that you are committed to the relationship with each other and your child – and it improves the chances that nursing will be successful! Here are three golden tips.

  1.Be supportive. Nursing can be exhausting. Why not get a glass of water for your partner or take more responsibility at home than you would normally do? This will make things easier both for nursing and your relationship.

  2.Grab every opportunity to have close contact with your baby. Cuddle skin-to-skin, give baths, sing songs and let your baby sleep on your chest – these strengthen the bond between you and your baby just like nursing does. They will also help you learn to read your baby’s behavior and crying.

  3.You can’t nurse. Do what you can, instead. Let it be your job to burp the baby after nursing. And hold the baby in your arms for the same amount of time as it took to nurse.